Showing posts with label Military culture. Show all postscar insurance quotes in Austin
Showing posts with label Military culture. Show all postscar insurance quotes in Austin

Maxpeditions military inspired map case.


I've been using a Russian issue leather map case I picked up in Kazahkstan. I traded some gear with a Russian army major to get it years ago when I was deployed in the Middle East, now it appears they're becoming en vogue as fashion accessories. Maxpedition makes some good ones, minus the cool back story. Make your own.

M*A*S*H - Martinis and Medicine.

I grew up watching Hawkeye and the boys risk life and limb, while knocking back cocktails and chasing skirts. M*A*S*H shed a whole new light on war and cold war culture for me. Did you know that the series finale of M*A*S*H was, and still is, the most watched TV show of all time? Yep, it's true. Now you can own that and every other one in the complete M*A*S*H - Martinis and Medicine Collection. Besides all 11 seasons in one box, you also get tons of extras featuring the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, including bloopers, cast interviews, the 30th anniversary reunion, and much more. Besides, it was just a great show.

The future of fighting.





















Engadget found this for us,"No, the headgear in the photo above wasn't some unused prototype created for The Terminator; rather, it's a snazzy new helmet designed to give fighter pilots a better look at their surroundings. Within the tinted faceplate are two projectors which sync up with plane-mounted cameras and display images from the outside for the pilot to view. Essentially, this enables the operator to view high-resolution images (yes, even at night) of areas previously imperceptible without a warplane constructed entirely of plexiglass, and onboard sensors make sure that the imagery reflects exactly where the pilot is looking at any given moment. Furthermore, computerized systems can even feed in "essential flight and combat data on to the display," as well as target symbols of friendlies / enemies. The new visual system is apparently just one amenity on the oh-so-sophisticated Joint Strike Fighter, which the British are planning to pay £66 million ($139 million) apiece for after it hits the production line."

A new kind of military chic.


I've slept in choppers before, but it was in route to a combat operation, with about a hundred pounds of gear, weapons and the pungent smell of some cherry's airsickness bag mixed with serg's fresh pinch of Copenhagen. Yeah, I slept hard, exhausted and already weary of the long op that lay ahead and the dozens of clicks I'd be humping through the bush only to hole up in some hasty ditch somewhere, that i'd be digging with fifty year old army hand trowel, correction... a G.I. entrenching tool. I've never slept in a chopper like this, a boutique hotel concept that turned what looks like some old UH-3 Sea King into a micro bachelor pad. I'll try to find the hotel and give you some more info, so you can relive your glory days, reminiscing of pre-flight checks and op-evals over a nice bordeaux and a huge flatscreen watching The War.

The Italians are ready for battle.

Well, in the midst of trying to discover more about the rumored $1 million euro Lamborghini LP640 concept, I found the actual car to be released tomorrow, dubbed the Revention, this Lambo concept is part military transformer and jet fighter. I looks more like some anime Gundam monster than the post war machine that I listed earlier. I love it none the less, it just take some time to get used to, with its rakish profile, hard lines and razor edge feel, this LP640 is a weapon not a car. As for mass appeal the interior is probably the saving grace for this beast, with olive drab alcantara abound, bullet like details lining the headliner like strafing fire and a streamlined cockpit feel, the interior is surprisingly much more inviting than the militant exterior of its fuselage. The gauge cluster looks like some high tech heads up display come flight system and it even has a G-force indicator, so you know when you're about to red-out coming off the back straight on track day. All I can say is where's the kill switch, this thing is loaded.
www.jalopnik.com

Jet-spawned Lambo.

This year at the Frankfurt Autoshow a rumored Lambo concept was supposed to hit the showroom floor inspired by some of the great military jets of the modern age. The rumors haven't solidified but some interesting shots have surfaced but it's unclear if any of these are the real deal. The rumored LP640 could fetch as much a $1 million bucks, which puts it a very exclusive crowd of competitors. As for the one pictured here, I think its a very sinister look in cool cold war kind of way. Red star and all it wreaks of cold steel and concrete and seems eerily silent as if a air raid siren will begin to wail as you drop the throttle and rocket up from behind your enemies out of the stormy winter night. Some have called this cheesy and others still believe these kinds of mods to be cartoonish and unwarranted, I think its a fresh look and nice take on customization and makes for much more entertaining transportation. If Texans can mount the racks of steers on their Boss Hog caddies, it makes this euro-fighter that much scarier, let's face it, everything could you a little thematic polish, so let's place dress-up. Why else would Halloween be so fun?
www.jalopnik.com

Learn the rules, then break them.

Being in an active combat military unit is often equal parts parading around in starchy, spit and polish garrison, as it is down and dirty, bullet slinging, dirt encrusted combat ops. What most people don't realize is that the hyper-disciplined way of life that most military members are accustomed to changes dramatically as you move up the ranks or across them. The more brass you wear on your collar the easier the standards become or the less they are enforced. While privates sport freshly shorn virgin heads, and spend every moment scurrying around madly and getting barked at, the full birds and top brass are being literally chauffeured around in immaculate hummers with tons of kit, tents, heaters, A.C. and three squares of hot chow deep behind enemy lines, hardly roughing it when you lead from the rear. Although these old timers have endured their share of grunt work, but somehow life starts to get a lot less tough. Funny thing is if you progress laterally or say graduate out of the line, into the more elite units like Special Forces, SEALs, Para-rescue or especially Delta, the once strict standards of military conformism suddenly dissolve. The rules that were the basic standards of participation seem now to be just guidelines or loose suggestions for the elite few. No more uniforms and inspections, no haircuts with measured sideburns, gone are the gig-lines and rulers, formations are replaced with team breakfasts at the favourite greasy spoon and group P.T. and platoon conditioning become the operators responsibility. Special Forces operators gain a rare kind of freedom that says, I'm so badass at what i do, I don't need your retarded rules, I get it done fluently and with a ponytail, beard, my favourite Oakleys and a custom 9mm.

A famous encounter between a Delta operator and a Ranger captain, demonstrates this exclusive rebelliousness, as the captain spy's a locked and loaded weapon with the safety off, slung nonchalantly over an operators shoulder, he barks "safety that weapon sergeant", and the operator quietly holds his index finger in the air and defiantly states, "this is my safety, sir." Imagine what balls...what confidence. That is discipline of a higher caliber.

As a soldier becomes more tactically and technically proficient the insane amounts of imposed discipline are replaced with a silent sense of self reliance. The real threat doesn't descend upon you in loud droves with flags waving, name tags and brute force, but sneaks up on you with quiet assuredness and stealthful mastery, as your friend, a local. The rules are made obviouse, written for the masses so everyone can be counted on to be predictable, but when you master the fundamentals and move on to a higher level of soldiering, now you're playing an all new game and you'll make the rules up as you go. Di Oppresso Liber!